Point of View—What IS It? How to Find the Perfect Voice for YOUR Story


As a writer, I use 3rd Person and I tend to ‘Lock’ the POV to one character, or at the most, two characters. The reason I’m so strict in my own work is that I was the worst type of head-hopper – even hopping from paragraph to paragraph in some places.

This is one of the ‘kinder, gentler’ discussions about POV on any blog. I did a couple blog posts on the subject and wasn’t able to stay out of rant mode. I’ve read so many really horrible ‘first person’ stories that I’ve become allergic to that POV. It’s so easy for a beginner to get locked into a ‘stream of consciousness’ mode. Any time I see 1st person, I tend to cringe. Even trade published authors can get in over their heads, er, so to speak.

At one point, in my days on Authonomy.com – I was called a POV Nazi. These days, I keep a lower profile and don’t rant so much.

I recommend this blog post to anyone who has questions on POV, and am reblogging it to Jordan’s Croft.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Geiko Caveman. Geiko Caveman.

Monday, we talked about the Three Acts of a Writer’s Journey. The first hint we might be tipping into The Apprentice Phase is we hear the word P.O.V. and panic. What is THAT? Prisoners of Vietnam? Pets of Vegans? Pals of Viagra?

We ALL know writing a novel is FAR from easy. We just make it look that way 😉 .

Today, I’m putting on my editor’s hat. Many of you decided to become writers because you love to write. Duh. I’ll even bet most of you, back when you were in school, also made very good grades in English. Thus, you might assume that you naturally know how to write a novel that is fit for successful publication.

Maybe you do. But, if you are anything like me when I started out? You might not know as much as you think you do.

Why?

Our high…

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I’m Asking for Votes


Best Novella

Best Novella

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I have become a finalist for Best Novella of 2014 – however – in order to 'win' I need at least 20 votes. Your vote would go a long way to helping put 'The Emissary' in the top spot.

This is the link where you can vote: e-Festival of Words – Best Novella

You must register in order to vote. It’s free and I’ve never had any spam from this site.

“The Emissary: Journey” the first book of “Horsewomen of the Zombie Apocalypse.” I’m getting ready to send the second installment of the series to the copy editor.

“The Emissary” is a horse story as well as an adventure tale. The McLeod sisters use their horses to fight, as the Roman’s did, and as sentries with a keen sense of smell. I have always thought that horses were a better choice for the Zombie Apocalypse because of their instincts and the fact they eat grass not gasoline. The bow is the weapon of choice for the McLeod sisters because bows are quiet and arrows are reusable. The McLeods prefer stealth and agility over loud engines and bullets.

“The Emissary” is about how women could survive the Zombie Apocalypse – without the sterotypical roles of helpless-female or heartless Amazon. It’s my way of exploring the Apocalypse from a completely female point of view – cooperation, team work, empowering the weak and protecting the helpless, with a touch of humor.

The McLeod sisters are down-to-earth girls who have complete confidence in their training, their horses and each other. The Davidson clansmen who think they’re superior with their trucks and machine guns are in for a surprise.

Please feel free to get the e-book here:

The Emissary: Horsewomen of the Zombie Apocalypse it is free on Smashwords.

The Emissary: Horsewomen of the Zombie Apocalypse – Amazon US The e-book is $0.99 here.

The Emissary: Horsewomen of the Zombie Apocalypse – Amazon UK The e-book is 0.99 here.

In a world where the dead walk the land, Bethany McLeod must leave the safety of her fortress home to take her sisters Alexis, Dani and Julie cross-country to Fort Chatten, Kentucky. Alexis McLeod is a healer, nurse and pharmacist, eager to prove herself at Fort Chatten. Led by Bethany, the four sisters risk their lives to help the struggling Davidson clan.

It’s just three years since the Zombie Apocalypse. The McLeod and Davidson’s clans survive in a world where the muerto viviente – walking dead – infest the cities and towns. Armed to the teeth, the sisters are horse archers, a light cavalry quiet enough to avoid the muerto, or fast enough to outrun them. Militia, marauders and mad-men abound, the stinking dead walk the land, eating everything in their path.

Can four women and six horses make a hundred mile journey through the Zombie Apocalypse and arrive alive? What will they find if they get to Fort Chatten?

This story is suitable for all ages.

Don’t go change that channel!

I Humbly Announce: Nomination for Best Novella


2014nominee

I Humbly Announce: Nomination for Best Novella

Yes, I am very grateful for this nomination.

The Emissary: Journey is the first of the series “Horsewomen of the Zombie Apocalypse.”

In a world where the stinking dead walk the land, Bethany McLeod must take her sisters Alexis, Dani and Julie cross-country to Fort Chatten, Kentucky, a journey of 100 miles. Can four women and six horses make it 100 miles and arrive alive?

It’s just three years since the Zombie Apocalypse. The McLeod and Davidson’s clans survive in a world where the muerto viviente – walking dead – infest the cities and towns.

Alexis McLeod is a healer, eager to prove herself. She volunteers to travel to Fort Chatten, the home of the Davidson clan. Led by Bethany, the four sisters risk their lives to help Clan Davidson.

Armed to the teeth, the sisters are horse archers, light cavalry, quick enough to avoid the muerto.

Militia, marauders and mad-men abound, the stinking dead walk the land, eating everything in their path.

But what will they find if they get to Fort Chatten?

This story is suitable for all ages.

The Author as Publisher (via The Militant Writer)


This is the kind of assement that fledgling authors like myself really need. Someone who has been inside the industry and is willing to share information. The difference between the old and new publishing industry is SO key.

Too many times, I find that my most experienced author friends assume I have more knowledge than I actually possess. As flattering as it may be (and I STILL love to be flattered) it often has me running to Google to figure out WTF they are talking about.

Not Mary, when I’m done reading her posts, I feel like I’ve been educated.

This bring me to the present – I am publishing my own work to Create Space. I’m working with Create Space on ‘Let’s Do Lunch’ and I’m going to do ‘Swallow the Moon’ myself. (Yes, I know, I’m doing it bacwards. But LDL has formatting bugs I couldn’t get out. StM doesn’t. LDD desperately needs a descent cover. StM just needs the right file from Ronnell Porter and I’m in business!)

Anyways – here is the post that got me working on paper publishing.

(Second in a series of articles about the new realities for writers and readers.) It seems inevitable to me now that unless they take up the sideline manufacture of weaponry or bath salts to subsidize themselves, the major publishing houses are going down. There will certainly be a role for niche publishers in future (literary presses that focus on poetry or esoteric fiction among them, teetering on the brink of expiration as they always have, an … Read More

via The Militant Writer

More Complaints About Indie Books – More Great Blog Posts in Rebuttle


So many people who think terrible things are going to happen because a few hundred writers have published e-books. Even if it is a few thousand writers, what is the difference?

Snookie (whatever a ‘snookie’ may be) has a book. Barbara Bush’s dog Millie had a book. Sarah, the Gun-Touting Republican who wants to be Queen of America has a couple of books AND a movie. Even the Axis of Evil Administration has published books.

So why isn’t the Wall Street Journal screaming bloody murder about THEM?

If anything, the lies and partial truths (ghost writers and all) in the books mentioned above should have had the “Gatekeepers” slamming doors and throwing away the keys to the Publishing Kingdom.

Instead those jokers got paid BIG bucks to hire ghost writers and pretend they had something to say. Why is the Literary Establishment patting them on the back(side) and handing them wads of cash?

Nah – they’d rather point to the rise of ‘e-pulp fiction’ as the End of the World. It must be more fun that way.

So here are the links to the blog posts of ‘them that matters’ in the world of DIY publishing. These are better reading.

Joe Konrath : http://jakonrath.blogspot.com/2011/07/tsunami-of-crap.html
Kristine Katherine Rusch: http://kriswrites.com/2011/07/06/the-business-rusch-slush-pile-truths/
Micheal Stackpole: http://www.michaelastackpole.com/?p=2668

Batting for a Broken System There was a ridiculous article last week in the Wall Street Journal called “Cherish The Book Publishers – You’ll Miss Them When They’re Gone.” I was going to write a take-down of this, but Kris Rusch and Joe Konrath beat me to it. You should check out both their responses. Krus Rusch goes point-by-point, and Joe Konrath, in a post titled “The Tsunami of Crap”, laughs at the ridiculousness of it all: “Some people believe the ease of self-publishin … Read More

via David Gaughran

Publish your book or play the lottery? (via Bob Mayer’s Blog)


Bob makes a good point today with this post.

I don’t see DIY publishing as a lottery ticket. I see it more as a venue – kinda like standup comedy mike nights. I write because I love to do it – I publish because I want to.

All my other hobbies pay for themselves. This one should to.

His point about backlist is very well taken. Because now that more and more backlist is hitting the e-book shelves there are fewer and fewer indie books being sold.

What a pity – if I had only been ready a year sooner – I might have made big bucks.

Right – and if you believe that I have a bridge to sell you.

One thing I see among many writers in these digital days is an overwhelming sense of wanting instant gratification.  Especially in this time of electronic wizardry where you can publish your eBook relatively quickly and then check your sales numbers the next day.  People are thinking in terms of days, weeks and months instead of years. While the technology has changed, I don’t think writing has, nor have the fundamentals required for success in p … Read More

via Bob Mayer's Blog